Employee Engagement: Six Causes of Disengaged Employees

EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT

Most people to work to earn a living, but that does not mean they are engaged with their work. Company leaders have long understood the link between engaged workers and a strong bottom line, but learning how to motivate workers, or determine how engaged they are, can be challenging. Consequently, many executives use executive consulting as a means to learn about employee engagement strategies.


Causes of Disengagement
Different work environments require different engagement strategies, but situations that make engagement difficult can happen at almost any company.

Below are six common causes of employee disengagement:
Workplace not as Expected
Even before they receive a job interview, many people perform significant research on the companies they believe they would enjoy working for. During the research, they read information that portrays the companies in the best light possible-a light that the reality of working for the companies can dim.


Although everyone anticipates a discrepancy between how a company presents itself on its website and how it operates from within, if the discrepancy is too great, new hires will be motivated to leave.


Poor Match With Job
To expedite the hiring process, hiring managers often accept a candidate’s technical qualifications as proof of his or her readiness to handle the job. Overlooked is the fact that the person may lack the talent to be a good candidate for the job.


Employees who lack the ideal talent for a position rarely interpret this to be the cause of their dissatisfaction with the position, but they should not have to. The hiring process should evaluate the talent of prospective hires in addition to their credentials.


Not Enough Coaching
Because motivated employees value good coaching, coaching can play an integral role in employee engagement. The key is to coach early and often, and balance the coaching with praise. Motivated employees will respond to thoughtful coaching like plants to sunlight.


Not Enough Advancement Opportunities
Advancement opportunities represent two things: the opportunity to receive higher pay, and the opportunity to distinguish oneself by assuming more responsibility. They also inspire people to set goals and work hard to achieve them-a perfect situation for being engaged in one’s job.


Overwork
At some companies, overwork is more of an expectation than a request. Working incessantly to reach career goals can be addictive for some, but for those who value personal time as much as work time, overwork can only end in burnout-the ultimate form of disengagement.


Lack of Recognition
At the end of the day, even humble workers desire recognition for their accomplishments. Without it, they can feel underappreciated and overlooked, especially if they have had a lengthy tenure with a company.


Conclusion
Employee engagement must be more than attained; it must also be maintained. At most companies, employees start their job with a sense of dedication, but whether they remain dedicated is another matter. If your company experiences a high turnover of employees due to job dissatisfaction, receiving executive consulting that focuses on employee satisfaction can help resolve the issue.

Learn more on employee engagement software at Kainexus.